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2018 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 27, 2018
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Department, Room 118
(Reception, Psychology Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

Universals in Personality Trait Psychology
Dr. Robert R. McCrae
Gloucester, Massachusetts

Picture of Robert McCrae

Robert R. McCrae (Retired) has conducted research on personality trait structure, assessment, and development. He is co-author, with Paul T. Costa, Jr., of the NEO Inventories and of Personality in Adulthood: A Five-Factor Theory Perspective. In the 1990s he began a series of collaborations in over 50 nations that focused initially on the generalizability of trait structure across cultures, and subsequently encompassed analyses of the universality of age- and gender differences, scale reliability, and trait heritability. His Five-Factor Theory offers one way to reconcile the demonstrated universals of trait psychology with the indisputable variations in thinking, feeling, and behavior that are seen across cultures.


2017 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, March 24, 2017
4:00-5:30 pm, Psychology Department, Room 118
(Reception, Psychology Room 230, 5:30-6:30 pm)

WEIRD Psychology:The Challenges of Searching for a Human Nature
Professor Steven Heine
Professor of Social and Cultural Psychology and Distinguished University Scholar
University of British Columbia

Picture of Steven Heine

Steven J. Heine is Professor of Social and Cultural Psychology and Distinguished University Scholar at the University of British Columbia, which is also where he received his PhD in 1996. He was previously an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and has had visiting appointments at Kyoto University and Tokyo University.

His research focuses on the ways that people maintain meaning in the face of threats, why people view genes as deterministic, and what aspects of our psychology are universal or culturally specific. He has published over seventy journal articles in such periodicals as Science, Nature, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and Psychological Review. He has authored the leading textbook in his field, entitled “Cultural Psychology” (now in its 3rd edition), and has recently written a tradebook called “DNA and Destiny.” He is a fellow of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology, the Society for Experimental Social Psychology, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Royal Society of Canada. He received the Distinguished Scientist Early Career Award for Social Psychology from the American Psychological Association in 2003 and the Career Trajectory Award from the Society of Experimental Social Psychology in 2011.


2016 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 22, 2016
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

Cultural Competency Research: The Stories Behind the Story
Professor Stanley Sue
Distinguished Professor and Co-Director, Center for Excellence in Diversity
Palo Alto University

Picture of Stanley Sue

Stanley Sue is Distinguished Professor of Clinical Psychology and Co-Director of the Center for Excellence in Diversity at Palo Alto University. He received a B.S. degree from the University of Oregon and the Ph.D. degree in psychology from UCLA. From 1996-2010, he was Professor of Psychology and Asian American Studies at the University of California, Davis; 1981-1996, Professor of Psychology at UCLA; 1971-1981, Assistant and Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. His research has been devoted to the study of the adjustment of, and delivery of mental health services to, culturally-diverse groups. His work documented the difficulties that ethnic minority groups experience in receiving adequate mental health services and offered directions for providing culturally-appropriate forms of treatment. Dr. Sue served as a member of the Planning Board for the Surgeon General's Report on Mental Health and also as Science Editor for the subsequent supplement Report on Culture, Race and Ethnicity in Mental Health. Dr. Sue has received a number of awards, including: 1986 American Psychological Association (APA) Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest; 1989 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Clinical Psychology from the Los Angeles County Society of Clinical Psychologists; 1990 Distinguished Contributions Award for Research on Ethnic Minorities from the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race (APA Division 45); 1990 Distinguished Contributions Award from the Asian American Psychological Association; 1995 Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Psychological Study of Diversity, American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology; 1996 APA Distinguished Contribution Award for Research in Public Policy; 1998 Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the California Psychological Association; 2003 APA Distinguished Contributions to Applied Research Award; 2005 Lifetime Achievement Award, California Psychological Association; 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award, Western Psychological Association.

Video

You can download the video here (mp4, 654 MB).


2015 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 17, 2015
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

The Power of Positive Speaking: Talking Up and Talking Down
Professor Susan Fiske
Eugene Higgins Professor, Psychology and Public Affairs
Princeton University

Picture of Susan Fiske

Susan T. Fiske is Eugene Higgins Professor, Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton University (Ph.D., Harvard University; honorary doctorates, Université Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; Universiteit Leiden, Netherlands; Universität Basel, Switzerland). She investigates social cognition, especially cognitive stereotypes and emotional prejudices, at cultural, interpersonal, and neuro-scientific levels. Author of over 300 publications and winner of numerous scientific awards, she has most recently been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Her just-published book is The HUMAN Brand: How We Relate to People, Products, and Companies (with Chris Malone, 2013). Sponsored by a Guggenheim, her 2011 Russell-Sage-Foundation book is Envy Up, Scorn Down: How Status Divides Us. With Shelley Taylor, she has written four editions of a classic text: Social Cognition (2013, 4/e). Currently an editor of Annual Review of Psychology, PNAS, and Policy Insights from Behavioral and Brain Sciences, she is also President of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS). The U.S. Supreme Court cited her gender-bias testimony, and she testified before President Clinton’s Race Initiative Advisory Board. These influenced her 2008 edited volume, Beyond Common Sense: Psychological Science in the Courtroom. Currently an editor of the Handbook of Social Psychology, she has also written an upper-level text Social Beings: Core Motives in Social Psychology (3/e). Past recipient of the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award and the Association for Psychological Science William James Award, she has previously been elected President of Association for Psychological Science, FABBS Foundation, Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, Fellow of the American Philosophical Society, and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Because it takes a village, her graduate students conspired for her to win Princeton’s Mentoring Award.

Video

You can download the video here (mp4, 442 MB).


2014 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 25, 2014
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People
Professor Mahzarin Banaji
Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics
Harvard University

Picture of Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji taught at Yale University from 1986-2002 where she was Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Psychology. Since then and at present she is Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and simultaneously George A. and Helen Dunham Cowan Chair in Human Dynamics at the Santa Fe Institute (2011-2014). She also served as the first Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard from 2002-2008. In 2005, Banaji was elected fellow of the Society for Experimental Psychologists, in 2008 to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2009 was named Herbert A. Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Psychological Science (of which she was President). For her research she has been awarded a James McKeen Cattell Award, the Morton Deutsch Award for Social Justice, and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Santa Fe Institute. In 2000, her work with R. Bhaskar received the Gordon Allport Prize for Intergroup Relations and her career contributions were recognized by a Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association in 2007. She also received the Carol and Ed Diener Award for Outstanding Contributions to Social Psychology in 2009. Dr. Banaji studies unconscious thinking and feeling as they unfold in social context. She has primarily studied social attitudes and beliefs in adults and children, relying on multiple methods including cognitive/affective behavioral measures and neuroimaging (fMRI). With these, she explores the implications of her work for questions of individual responsibility and social justice in democratic societies. Her current research interests focus on the origins of social cognition and applications of implicit cognition to improve organizational practices.

Video

You can download the video here (mp4, 745 MB).


2013 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 26, 2013
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

Clash! 8 Cultural Conflicts that Make Us Who We Are
Professor Hazel Rose Markus
Davis-Brack Professor
Stanford University

Picture of Hazel Rose Markus

Hazel Rose Markus is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Her research examines how the self is shaped by the social world and how the self organizes thought, feeling and action. She received her B.A. from California State University at San Diego and her PhD. from the University of Michigan. She was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1994 and in 2008 received the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Contribution. She is the author of many articles and the co-author of Culture and Emotion: Their Mutual Influence, Engaging Cultural Differences: The Multicultural Challenge in Liberal Democracies, Just Schools: Pursuing Equality in Societies of Difference, and Doing Race: 21 Essays for the 21st Century; Facing Social Class: The Role of Societal Rank in Social Interaction, and the forthcoming: Clash! 8 Cultural Conflicts that Make Us Who We Are.

Video

You can download the video here (mp4, 2.5 GB).


2012 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 20, 2012
3:35-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:00 pm)

The Social Psychology of Population Differences in Health
Professor James Jackson
Daniel Katz Distinguished Professor of Psychology
University of Michigan

Picture of James Jackson

James S. Jackson is the Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, and Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies. He is the Director and Research Professor of the Institute for Social Research. He is past Director of the Program for Research on Black Americans and the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies. He is past-Chair of the Section on Social, Economic, and Political Sciences (K) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He is a former National President of the Black Students Psychological Association and the Association of Black Psychologists and the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues. He served on the Councils of the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute on Aging. He is a member of the Advisory Council to the NIH Director. He is a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Society of Experimental Social Psychology, American Psychological Association, Association of Psychological Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the New York Academy of Medicine, and the W.E.B. Du Bois Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He received the Distinguished Career Contributions to Research Award, Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues, American Psychological Association, the James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for Distinguished Career Contributions in Applied Psychology, the Association for Psychological Sciences, Pearmain Prize for Excellence in Research on Aging, University of Southern California, Senior Health Policy Investigator, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Presidential Citation, American Psychological Association, and the Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Sciences, New York Academy of Medicine. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Video

You can download the video here (mp4, 494 MB).


2011 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 1, 2011
3:15-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:30 pm)

Culture and Happiness around the World
Professor Ed Diener
Joseph R. Smiley Distinguished Professor of Psychology
University of Illinois

Picture of Ed Diener

Dr. Ed Diener is the Joseph R. Smiley Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Illinois. Dr. Diener was the president of both the International Society of Quality of Life Studies and the Society of Personality and Social Psychology. He was the editor of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and the editor of Journal of Happiness Studies. Diener is the founding editor of Perspectives on Psychological Science. He has over 240 publications, with about 190 being in the area of the psychology of well-being. Professor Diener's research focuses on the measurement of well-being; temperament and personality influences on well-being; theories of well-being; income and well-being; and cultural influences on well-being. He has edited three recent books on subjective well-being, and a 2005 book on multi-method measurement in psychology. Diener is currently writing a popular book on happiness with his son, Robert Biswas-Diener, and authoring a book on policy uses of accounts of well-being with Richard Lucas, Ulrich Schimmack, and John Helliwell.

Video

You can download the video here (MP4, 406MB).




2010 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, March 19, 2010
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:30 pm)

Intelligence and how to get it: Why schools and cultures count
Professor Richard Nisbett
Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished University Professor
University of Michigan

Picture of Richard Nisbett

Dr. Richard Nisbett is Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished Univer­sity Professor at the University of Michigan and is the first psychologist in his field in a generation to be elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Nisbett is one of the world’s foremost authori­ties on how culture and social context affect thinking, perception and behavior. In his recent book, The Geography of Thought, Professor Nisbett looks at how Asians and Western­ers think differently and why. In his new book, Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Cultures Count, Dr. Nisbett challenges the prevailing idea that biology and especially genetics deter­mine intelligence. Instead, he emphasizes the role of culture in determining intelligence and he gives us new tools for understanding and fostering the kind of success for which we use ‘intelligence’ as an indicator. A Research Professor at the Research Center for Group Dynamics at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Dr. Nisbett also studies group decision making, conformity and independence, and social factors affecting school performance, among other subjects. He has also received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Associ­ation as well as the William James Fellow Award from the Ameri­can Psychological Society.

Video

You can download the video here.



2009 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research
Department of Psychology

Michigan State University
Friday, April 24, 2009
3:30-5:00 pm, Psychology Room 118
(Reception, Room 230, 5:00-6:30 pm)

Cultural Syndromes and their Effects on Some Psychological Variables
Professor Harry Triandis
University of Illinois

Picture of Harry Triandis

Harry C. Triandis is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University of Illinois. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York in 1958, and an honorary doctorate from the University of Athens, Greece, in 1987. He was Chairman and Secretary General of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology; President of the International Association of Cross-cultural Psychology (1974-76), the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the InterAmerican Society of Psychology, and the International Association of Applied Psychology (1990-1994), as well as of Divisions 8 and 9 of the American Psychological Association. He was Ford Foundation Faculty Fellow, 1964-65, Fellow of the Center for International Studies, Cornell University, 1968-69, Guggenheim Fellow, 1972-73 at the Center for Advanced Studies, University of Illinois, 1972-73;1979-80. He received an Award for significant contributions to the development of psychology from the Interamerican Society of Psychology, 1981. He is an Honorary Fellow of the International Association of Cross-Cultural Psychology (1982), was a Distinguished Fulbright Professor to India (1983), Fellow, American Association for Advancement of Science (1984), University of Illinois Scholar (1987), received the Centennial Citation from the American Psychological Association, "for significant contributions to the establishment of cross-cultural psychology as a distinct discipline" (1992), was an American Psychological Association Distinguished Scientist Lecturer in 1994. Received the Klineberg Award, of the Society for the Psychological Study Social Issues (1994), the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Contributions to International Psychology Award (1995), American Psychological Society’s James M. Cattell Award (1996). The American Psychological Association’s Division 52 (International) named him Distinguished International Psychologist of the Year in 2002. He received the Lifetime Contributions Award from the Academy of Intercultural Research (May 2004, in Taiwan).

Video

You can download the video here (avi, 280 MB).



2008 Annual Distinguished Lecture in Multicultural Psychology

Consortium for Multicultural Psychology
Department of Psychology
Michigan State University
MSU Union, Gold Room B (Second Floor)
3:30-5:00 pm, Monday, April 21, 2008
Reception from 5:00-6:30 pm

Cultural Contexts of Men’s Sexual Aggression
Dr. Gordon C. Nagayama Hall, Ph.D

Picture of Dr. Gordon C. Nagayama Hall

Gordon C. Nagayama Hall, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology at the University of Oregon. His research interests are in the cultural context of psychopathology, particularly sexual aggression. Dr. Hall is currently investigating the effectiveness with Asian Americans of treatments that are empirically-supported for other groups. He is also interested in behavioral genomics approaches to genetic and cultural factors implicated in antisocial behavior. He was previously President of the American Psychological Association Society for the Psychological Study of Ethnic Minority Issues and received the Distinguished Contribution Award from the Asian American Psychological Association. He is a Fellow of the Asian American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. Dr. Hall is currently editor of Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, as well as Associate Editor of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.


SPECIAL RECEPTION FOLLOWS:
A combined reception to honor Professor Hall and to celebrate the official launching of the Consortium for Multicultural Psychology Research will be held from 5:00-6:30 pm in the Gold Room B of the MSU Union. Refreshments will be served and souvenirs from the Consortium will also be distributed at the reception.

Co-sponsors: Asian Pacific American Studies Program, Counseling Center, Departments of Psychiatry, Social Work, Family & Child Ecology.

Video

You can download the video here (WMV, 1.3GB).